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April 2021
free program but pre-registration required

Rescue at Entebbe

April 18
A JOYOUS WAVE OF HAND AND A TENSE SEARCHING LOOK  BY HOME COMING AIR FRANCE HOSTAGES, RESCUED FROM ENTEBBE    AIRPORT.

11 AM LOS ANGELES • 2 PM NEW YORK

9 PM JERUSALEM

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“I flew to the Entebbe operation as an Israeli, and returned to Israel as a Jew.” – Rami Sherman

This year marks the 45th anniversary of history’s most daring and influential rescue: the 1976 Operation Thunderbolt, during which Israeli commandos liberated more than 100 hostages held by German and Palestinian terrorists in Entebbe, Uganda. Meet one of the mission’s leaders, Rami Sherman, who served as an officer in Israel’s top commando unit, and Boaz Dvir, an award-winning nonfiction storyteller who spent the past decade researching this operation, to hear a new take on an operation that continues to impact America’s counterterrorism strategy.

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Lessons in Moral Courage — Irshad Manji in conversation with Abraham H. Foxman

April 25
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1 PM LOS ANGELES • 4 PM NEW YORK

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Irshad Manji is the winner of Oprah Winfrey’s first annual Chutzpah Award for boldness. As founder of the Moral Courage Project, Irshad equips people to do the right thing in the face of fear. She discovered her mission through a deeply personal journey. In 2003, Irshad released The Trouble with Islam Today, an open letter to her fellow Muslims about why anti-Semitism and other prejudices must end in the name of Allah. In 2007, Irshad turned the book into an Emmy-nominated PBS film, Faith Without Fear. And in 2011, she published Allah, Liberty & Love, which shows how Islam can be reinterpreted for the 21st century. Along the way, Irshad became a professor of moral courage — first teaching at New York University and now lecturing with Oxford University’s Initiative for Global Ethics and Human Rights. Irshad’s latest book is Don’t Label Me. In our deeply polarized time, she says, standing for what’s right is not enough to make progress. We must also learn to engage the “Other.” Labeling is easy. But listening is a form of moral courage. (more…)

May 2021
free program but pre-registration required

Captain Barros Basto, the Portuguese Dreyfus

May 2
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11 AM LOS ANGELES • 2 PM NEW YORK

7 PM LISBON • 9 PM JERUSALEM

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Artur Carlos de Barros Basto was a captain in the Portuguese military who was discharged as a Jew despite having been raised as a Catholic. Descended from a family forcibly converted during The Inquisition, he rediscovered his Judaism and underwent a formal conversion. Then he built the largest synagogue in the Iberian peninsula in order to attract other “conversos” to reclaim the religion of their ancestors. A remarkable story!  (more…)

Faye Schulman, Partisan and Photographer

May 9
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1 PM LOS ANGELES • 4 PM NEW YORK

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This Mother’s Day program shines a light on the brave partisan Faye Schulman, whose photographs are the only visual record of the resistance action of the Polish partisans. The program is co-presented with the Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation (JPEF) and will be moderated by Mitch Braff.
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free program but pre-registration required

Spy Princess — The Story of Noor Inayat Khan

May 16
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11 AM LOS ANGELES • 2 PM NEW YORK

7 PM LONDON • 8 PM PARIS

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Noor Inayat Khan was the daughter of a Sufi Indian father and an American mother, and she grew up in Paris and London. As a British agent under the codename Madeleine, she became the first female radio operator to be sent from the UK into occupied France to aid the French Resistance during World War II. She was captured after being betrayed, and executed at Dachau, where her last word was Liberté!  She was posthumously awarded the George Cross, the highest civilian decoration in the United Kingdom, and there is now a statue of her in central London.

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tickets by donation

Mendelssohn, the Nazis and Me

May 23
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11 AM LOS ANGELES • 2 PM NEW YORK

7 PM LONDON

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Felix Mendelssohn was a child prodigy pianist and composer who was famous from a young age. Born into an illustrious Berlin Jewish family (his grandfather was the theologian Moses Mendelssohn who began the assimilation of Jews into German society), Felix was baptised Lutheran, along with his siblings, at the age of seven, in part because at that time Jews in Germany did not have full civil rights. For the rest of his short life (he died at age 38), Mendelssohn strove to unite the two religions in his music, continuing what his grandfather had begun. He became one of Germany’s most beloved composers, and millions of brides have walked down the aisle to his Wedding March. One hundred years later the Nazis came to power, banned Mendelssohn’s music in Germany and re-classified his (mainly Lutheran) descendants as Jews, threatening their lives. One of these descendants, the filmmaker Sheila Hayman, decided to tell her family’s story on screen. Her wide-ranging and fascinating film is about the madness of labels and the unifying power of music.


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